The feeling wheel

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There are primary emotions and secondary emotions. The primary emotions are the basics such as madness, sadness, and happiness. Secondary emotions are those who are mixtures, the overlapping part in the Venn diagram. Emotions for these would be disappointment and surprise. All emotions derive from primary emotions. It’s just like the color wheel. There are the primary colors (red, blue, yellow) and from those primary colors emerge secondary colors (purple, pink, turquoise).

Make sure your students or children understand and express their emotions. Teach them the different ways they can respond and deal with different feelings, conflicts, or problems.

Here is a useful link where you can find some strategies on how to help your children learn about their feelings:

http://csefel.vanderbilt.edu/familytools/teaching_emotions.pdf

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The hyperactive child in our classroom

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source: http://www.behavioradvisor.com/AddStrats.html

 

Although children with ADHD may be difficult to teach, knowing the reasons for their behavior can be helpful in choosing the right strategies to deal with the situation. Providing structured classroom activities, personal attention, as well as positive expectations, are good strategies to follow for hyperactive children, as well as for all students.

In every school classroom there are one or more children who have been labeled with ADHD. Students with ADHD may exhibit some of the following behaviours:

  • He is or seems to be absent-minded, he does not participate in the lesson and probably he is not listening.
  • He often stands up, annoys his classmates and has trouble to stay in his sit during the lesson. He seems to be nervous.
  • He can not concentrate in one task, he usually forgets the rules or the instructions or what he is told to do.
  • He answers a question before it is completed and thus he answers it wrong.
  • He can not concentrate and he may forget a word or a whole sentence when he writes.
  • He has trouble to follow instructions and many times he stops doing a task, leaving it unfinished because the forgets what he has to do or because he can not understand the instructions.
  • He loses his stuff and his books or he forgets to bring them either to school or home.

What we have to do: 

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