The feeling wheel

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There are primary emotions and secondary emotions. The primary emotions are the basics such as madness, sadness, and happiness. Secondary emotions are those who are mixtures, the overlapping part in the Venn diagram. Emotions for these would be disappointment and surprise. All emotions derive from primary emotions. It’s just like the color wheel. There are the primary colors (red, blue, yellow) and from those primary colors emerge secondary colors (purple, pink, turquoise).

Make sure your students or children understand and express their emotions. Teach them the different ways they can respond and deal with different feelings, conflicts, or problems.

Here is a useful link where you can find some strategies on how to help your children learn about their feelings:

http://csefel.vanderbilt.edu/familytools/teaching_emotions.pdf

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Children’s Rights

Children’s rights are the human rights of children with particular attention to the rights of special protection and care afforded to minors. The Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) of 1989 defines a child as any human person who has not reached the age of eighteen years.

Children’s rights includes their right to association with both parents, human identity as well as the basic needs for physical protection, food, universal state-paid education, health care, and criminal laws appropriate for the age and development of the child, equal protection of the child’s civil rights, and freedom from discrimination on the basis of the child’s race, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, religion, disability, colour, ethnicity, or other characteristics. Interpretations of children’s rights range from allowing children the capacity for autonomous action to the enforcement of children being physically, mentally and emotionally free from abuse, though what constitutes “abuse” is a matter of debate. Other definitions include the rights to care and nurturing ( Bandman, 1999).

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Convention on the Rights of the Child: http://www.ohchr.org/en/professionalinterest/pages/crc.aspx

Bandman, B. (1999) Children’s Right to Freedom, Care, and Enlightenment. Routledge. p 67.

Classroom accommodations for students with ADHD

Children with ADHD face difficulties with focus, hyperactivity and impulsivity, which can make it harder to learn in the classroom. Here are some accommodations that can assist them.

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Source: https://www.understood.org/en/school-learning/partnering-with-childs-school/instructional-strategies/at-a-glance-classroom-accommodations-for-adhd?utm_campaign=understoodorg&utm_medium=social&utm_source=pinterest

How much sleep does your baby need?

Making sure your baby gets enough sleep typically ranks high among a parent’s concerns. Every baby is different, and some need more sleep than others. But there are general guidelines on how many hours of sleep the average child requires at various ages.

Schedule your baby’s naps and meals at the same times each day to get him used to being in a routine. This predictability helps him stay calm and happy, which makes it easier for him to settle down to sleep.

Here is a sleep chart that I found on Pinterest (unfortunately there was not an original source).

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The benefits of bilingualism

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Speaking two languages (or more) has practical benefits for the person. Here are some facts about bilingualism:

1. Bilingualism actually grows grey matter! Brain scans reveal a greater density of grey matter in areas of the brain associated with language processing in people who learned a second language under the age of five (Mechelli A., et al., 2004).

2. Bilinguals develop strong thinking and cognitive skills.

3. They cultivate greater cultural awareness since they are more exposed to more than one culture.

4. They understand better math concepts due to abstract thinking.

5. Focus and make decisions easier. They are more certain of their choices after thinking them over in their second language.

6. They are good multitaskers since they are able to switch between two tasks.

7. Their memory is strong. Learning a language involves memorizing rules and vocabulary which strengthens the mental muscle.

8. They have increased reading comprehension.

9. A multilingual brain is quicker and more resistant to Alzheimer’s.

10. Bilingual children do better in education. They have been shown to be better than their monolingual peers at focusing on a task while tuning out distractions. This seemingly enhanced ability to concentrate has also been found in bilingual adults, especially those who became fluent in two languages at an early age. It is thought that being able to filter things out when switching language enhances the brain’s ability to focus and ignore irrelevant information.

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Separation Anxiety in toddlers

At some point during their development, all babies will experience separation anxiety. This is very common, completely normal and demonstrates that your child has a healthy and loving attachment to you. However, it can be difficult for parents to cope with a child who gets panicky and upset when they are not around. The good news is, for the vast majority of babies, separation anxiety happens in phases and will not last forever.

What is separation anxiety?

Around the age of 10 months, you may notice that your child becomes restless when he is away from you. Whenever you move away and disappear from the field of view or assign someone else to watch, even if you are in the next room, he becomes upset and starts crying. When you put him to sleep, he refuses to let you go and he may wake up during the night looking for you. This developmental stage is known as Separation Anxiety. Your child has not yet learned that parents are still there and will return, even if they are in the next room. This stage reaches its peak between 10 to 18 months, and continues to exist until 2-4 years.

Tips: How to make the separations easier

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